Impress Your Friends, Win Adulations
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 "Calculate on Your Feet"
(even with your shoes on)
"an IonSource.Com mini tutorial"

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Converting from micrograms (g) to nanomoles (nmol) to picomoles (pmol) to nanomolar to milimolar can be confusing.  The goal of this short tutorial is to show you a way to easily inter-convert these values while standing in front of your mass spectrometer talking to a client.

Remember: M > mM > M > nM > pM > fM

1.) Quantities: An easy method to convert nmols to gs 

Easy trick number one.

1 nmol of a compound is equal to the kDa mass of the compound converted to gs.  
For example 1 nmol of a 50 kDA protein is 50 g.

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The Proof:

1 mole of a 50 kDa protein is 

50,000 g

1 millimole is

50 g or 50,000,000 g

1 micromole is 

50,000 g

1 nanomole is
50 g
2.) Concentrations: An easy method to convert molar concentration to absolute quantities. (because as LC/MS people we always want to know the absolute amount going on to the HPLC column.)
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Easy trick number two.
A 1 millimolar solution of a compound is equal to the kDa mass of the compound converted to gs/l.  
For example a 1 millimolar solution of a 50 kDa protein is 50 g/l.
The Proof:

A 1 molar solution of a 50 kDa protein is

50,000 g/L

A 1 millimolar solution of a 50 kDa protein is

50 g/L
or
50 ug/ul
Q: For example if someone says, "I have 10 Ls of a 10 mM solution of a 50 kDa protein", how many gs does he have?

A: A one mM solution would be 50 g/l therefore a 10 mM solution is 10 X 50 g/l = 500 g/l and then 10 l of such a solution is 10 X 500 g/l = 5000 g

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In Summary

1.) 1 nmol of a 50 kDa compound is 50 g
2.) A 1 mM solution of a 50 kDa compound is at a concentration of 50 g/l

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Last updated:  Wednesday, April 23, 2014 09:18:12 AM